Extended Stein-Zimmermann accidentals (U+E290–U+E29F)

Glyph Description Glyph Description
U+E290
accidentalReversedFlatArrowUp
Reversed flat with arrow up
U+E291
accidentalReversedFlatArrowDown
Reversed flat with arrow down
U+E292
accidentalFilledReversedFlatArrowUp
Filled reversed flat with arrow up
U+E293
accidentalFilledReversedFlatArrowDown
Filled reversed flat with arrow down
U+E294
accidentalReversedFlatAndFlatArrowUp
Reversed flat and flat with arrow up
U+E295
accidentalReversedFlatAndFlatArrowDown
Reversed flat and flat with arrow down
U+E296
accidentalFilledReversedFlatAndFlat
Filled reversed flat and flat
U+E297
accidentalFilledReversedFlatAndFlatArrowUp
Filled reversed flat and flat with arrow up
U+E298
accidentalFilledReversedFlatAndFlatArrowDown
Filled reversed flat and flat with arrow down
U+E299
accidentalHalfSharpArrowUp
Half sharp with arrow up
U+E29A
accidentalHalfSharpArrowDown
Half sharp with arrow down
U+E29B
accidentalOneAndAHalfSharpsArrowUp
One and a half sharps with arrow up
U+E29C
accidentalOneAndAHalfSharpsArrowDown
One and a half sharps with arrow down
   

Implementation notes

These accidentals were not actually proposed by Richard Stein or Bernd Zimmermann, but are instead logical extensions of their symbols adding arrows to provide options for notating slight pitch modifications1.

1. Gould, ibid., page 96 acknowledges the Stein-Zimmermann accidentals as the most commonly-used symbols with fixed meanings; however, the extensions provided here do not have fixed meanings.